News & Press

Pint-Size Ballet Fits All Slippers

Pint-Size Ballet Fits All Slippers

By Jack Anderson, The New York Times

Since Diana Byer founded the New Theatre Ballet in 1978, this troupe has staged many types of productions.
Among its most appealing are what could be called pint-size ballets for tiny balletgoers: one-act,
hourlong adaptations of famous eveninglong works that have been tailored to appeal to the attention spans
of very small children.
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Once Upon a Ballet: NYTB Brings Fairy Tales to Life

Once Upon a Ballet: NYTB Brings Fairy Tales to Life

By Janice Barringer, Dancer Magazine

Thousands of young children are enrolled in dance classes all over the country, and we know that little girls dream of being a ballerina.  They have bedrooms that are decorated with lovely dancers swirling on their toes; they carry book bags and totes with giant pictures of shiny pointe shoes.  Yet, there are very few opportunities for these youngsters to actually see this beautiful art form in a venue on their level. 
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Shoestrings

By Mary Cargill, danceviewtimes
Friday November 20, 2009

This cozy "Dance on a Shoestring" performance featured an intriguing mixture of old and new, classroom exercises and spirited revivals, dance with verve by the small, vibrant New York Theatre Ballet. The performance opened with company director Diana Byer's setting of the last ballet choreographed by Sallie Wilson, who had worked closely with the company. "Pas de Six--Gounod", to the bounding, infectious and dancey music from "Faust" was a charming exercise in Cechetti technique for six dancers featuring gentle arabesques, flowing arms, and delicate batterie--a perfect work for a spring night, anytime of the year. Details >

 

 Small Steps, Big Dreams

By Vincent Mallozzi, The New York Times
Friday June 26, 2009

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Inimitable Tudor

Inimitable Tudor

By Tobi Tobias, VoiceofDance.com
Friday February 15, 2008

To honor the 100th anniversary of Antony Tudor’s birth the New York Theatre Ballet presented two of the choreographer’s major works, Jardin aux Lilas (Lilac Garden) and Judgment of Paris, as well as Little Improvisations, merely a bagatelle, but still echt, inimitable Tudor.
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Restoring Luster to Two 20th-Century Dance Legends by Alastair Macaulay, February 2008

Restoring Luster to Two 20th-Century Dance Legends by Alastair Macaulay, February 2008

This year brings the centenaries of the births of two choreographers who loomed large in New York in the middle of the last century:  José Limón, who died in 1972, and Anthony Tudor, who died in 1987.  Theirs are once-big names whose legacies seem to be shrinking.  Plenty of today's dancegoers have never seen a single work by either.  Special thanks, then, to the enterprising New York Theater Ballet last weekend for giving New York what I believe are the year's first staged revivals of either man's work.
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Tudor and Limon Celebrated by Susan Reiter, February 2008

Tudor and Limon Celebrated by Susan Reiter, February 2008

The centennials of two major, and very different, 20th-century choreographers were celebrated with evident dedication and charming intimacy in this program. Given New York Theatre Ballet's longtime association with Antony Tudor's works, in meticulous stagings by former ABT principal and Tudor specialist Sallie Wilson, the evening was primarily devoted to his dances. But the inclusion of Limón's unfamiliar and surprising "Mazurkas" was an intelligent complementary bit of programming.
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The Alice-in-Wonderland Follies by Elizabeth Zimmer, June 2001

The Alice-in-Wonderland Follies by Elizabeth Zimmer, June 2001


Choreographer Keith Michael calls The Alice-in-Wonderland Follies a ballet vaudeville and sets it in New York’s Palace Theater circa 1915, 50 years after the publication of Lewis Carroll’s Victorian masterwork. His musical choices range from 19th-century favorites by Robert Schumann to rags and pop songs of the pre-World War I era. These give
the hour-long enterprise – pitched at children but with enough visual wit and beautifully executed dancing
to hold the most finicky ballet fan – a richness and intimacy rare on local stages, even the biggest ones.
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